Tin song ngữ

  1. Tin tức song ngữ Anh-Việt
  2. Thời sự
  3. Giải trí
  4. 4 ngôi làng cổ ở Trung Quốc vẫn còn tồn tại đến tận ngày nay

4 ngôi làng cổ ở Trung Quốc vẫn còn tồn tại đến tận ngày nay

03/03/2017
Mức trung cấp

4 Ancient Chinese Villages (That Are Still Around Today)

Photo of Xitang taken on April 14, 2007. (Cancan Chu/Getty Images)

Due to a long history of invasions, famines, civil wars and breakneck “zombie development” in real estate, many Chinese communities have lost much of their way of life, starting with their spatial and architectural heritage.

But there will always be exceptions. Some villages, by luck or design, have had the fortune to hold out against calamity and modernity to preserve their age-old dwellings and environs. Below are four examples:

Xitang, a 2,500-Year-Old Canal Town

It’s where Tom Cruise leapt onto roofs and vaulted over walls in “Mission Impossible 3.” It’s been visited by beauty pageant contestants. But long before any of that, the town of Xitang in eastern China began its history as a staging ground for a valiant ancient general.

Two thousand five hundreds years ago, China was entering into a 300-year period of civil war, known as the Warring States Period. One of the first and most iconic conflicts in this time was that between the states of Wu and Yue. Xitang was established when the general Wu Zixu dug out a canal to help his troops ferry provisions to the front.

SONY DSC

Photo of Xitang . (via Sina)

Later, the riverway, located between Shanghai and the provinces of Zhejiang and Jiangsu, was used for more peaceful purposes. More canals have been dug out over the ages, forming 122 small alleys with homes built directly on the water. Most transport and trading is done by boat.

As a local folk saying goes: “the water is from the Spring and Autumn Period, the town is from the Tang and Song dynasties, the buildings are from the Ming and Qing, and the people from today.”

A fisherman catches fish with his cormorants on a canal on January 31, 2006 in Xitang Township of Jiashan County, Zhejiang Province, southeast China. (China Photos/Getty Images)

A fisherman catches fish with his cormorants on a canal on January 31, 2006 in Xitang Township of Jiashan County, Zhejiang Province, southeast China. (China Photos/Getty Images)

The Eight Trigram Labyrinth

The Zhuge Bagua village. (via Sina)

The Zhuge Bagua village. (via Sina)

Viewed from the nearby hills, the Bagua Village in Lanxi, Zhejiang Province, looks like a piece of art. This town of 4,000 has been built in the shape of the Taoist Bagua, or Eight Trigram symbol, and not to attract tourists.

The village was meticulously designed several hundred years ago, in the Yuan Dynasty, by architect Zhuge Dashi. The dwellings were destroyed and rebuilt over the years—two hundreds examples from the Ming and Qing dynasties remain.

At the center of the village is a round space in the form of the Taoist Tai Chi symbol, with the yin (dark side) being a pool, and the yang (light side) being solid ground.

Extending out from the Tai Chi are radial streets dividing the village into its eight sections, which correspond to the Eight Trigrams. The Trigrams are an ancient tool used in divination and fortune-telling, and said to have been passed down by the god Fu Xi.

Sight spots distribution map of Zhuge Bagua village. (via Sina)

Sight spots distribution map of Zhuge Bagua village. (via Sina)

Zhuge planned the village with thought to its security and harmony. Rather than having doors to different housing units be placed opposite each other, he had them built at different intervals, ensuring that families would be able to maintain a healthy distance to avoid conflicts. At the same time, the village’s maze-like layout confuses strangers and deters crime by outsiders. It also aids in collective defense.

Zhuge Dashi is a descendant of the master strategist and Taoist cultivator Zhuge Liang, famous for his role in the Three Kingdoms era. Most of the villagers are also descended from the legendary figure.

The Eight Trigrams emblem on one of walls in the village. (via Sina)

The Eight Trigrams emblem on one of walls in the village. (via Sina)

A Town Without Walls

Located in Yunnan Province on China’s southern frontier bordering Burma and India, the town of Lijiang, home to the Nakhi ethnic minority, is notable for its lack of walls.

A UNESCO World Heritage Site, Lijiang sits at an altitude of 2,400 meters (about 8,000 feet) above sea level. Its history dates back to the Yuan Dynasty, and third of its inhabitants still work in traditional crafts and commerce manufacturing bronze and silverware, or working at looms and breweries.

The old town of Lijiang. (via Ctrip)

The old town of Lijiang. (via Ctrip)

Architecture in Lijiang is a unique mix of Chinese, Tibetan, and Nakhi ethnic styles. A defining landmark is the 20-meter-tall Wufeng tower, built in 1601 during the Ming Dynasty.

The old town of Lijiang. (via chanyouji.cn)

The old town of Lijiang. (via chanyouji.cn)

A Piece of Tibetan Glory

For most of China’s history, Tibet was not a territory governed by the emperor, but a powerful neighbor. While Tibetan culture and customs have suffered much destruction in recent history, one particularly complete example of a Tibetan village, Dukezong in Yunnan Province, survived relatively unscathed.

Built about 1,300 years ago during the Tang Dynasty, Dukezong lies on the ancient tea and salt trading route connecting Yunnan with Burma. It was originally built as a military stockade for Tibetan troops, and the name itself means “castle built on the rocks.”

Dukezong town. (via Wikipedia)

Dukezong town. (via Wikipedia)

A unique ancient product of Dukezong is a knife of such high quality that it can easily slice through nails without damage, as demonstrated in a report by the state-run China Central Television.

Unfortunately, Dukezong was ravaged by a major fire in 2014 that destroyed hundreds of homes. It is currently under restoration.

Dukezong. (via Ctrip)

Dukezong. (via Ctrip)

Source: theepochtimes.com

4 ngôi làng cổ ở Trung Quốc vẫn còn tồn tại đến tận ngày nay

Trấn Tây Đường, ảnh chụp ngày 14/04/2007 (Cancan Chu/Getty Images)

Trấn Tây Đường, ảnh chụp ngày 14/04/2007 (Cancan Chu/Getty Images)

Trải qua lịch sử lâu đời hứng chịu ngoại xâm, nghèo đói, những cuộc nội chiến, cùng với sự phát triển chóng mặt của “các dự án đầu tư ma” trong lĩnh vực bất động sản, rất nhiều điều trong lối sống của nhiều cộng đồng người Hoa đã bị thất truyền, khởi đầu là sự biến mất về mặt di sản không gian và kiến trúc.

Tuy nhiên, vẫn luôn có những trường hợp ngoại lệ. Có lẽ do may mắn hoặc do cách thiết kế mà một số làng cổ vẫn tồn tại, mặc cho những thiên tai khắc nghiệt và quá trình hiện đại hóa, họ vẫn giữ được những ngôi nhà và không gian sống cổ kính. Dưới đây là 4 ví dụ điển hình:

Tây Đường – thị trấn sông nước 2.500 năm tuổi

Đây là nơi nam diễn viên Hollywood Tom Cruise nhảy lên mái nhà và phóng qua các bức tường trong bộ phim “Mission Impossible 3” (tạm dịch: Nhiệm vụ Bất khả thi – phần 3). Ngoài ra, các thí sinh Hoa Hậu cũng từng viếng thăm ngôi làng cổ này. Nhưng từ rất xa xưa, nguyên ban đầu thị trấn Tây Đường ở miền đông Trung Quốc lại là căn cứ địa cho một vị tướng dũng cảm.

Cách đây 2.500 năm, Trung Quốc lâm vào cuộc nội chiến kéo dài 300 năm, gọi là thời Chiến Quốc. Một trong những cuộc xung đột đầu tiên và mang tính biểu tượng nhất trong thời kỳ này là cuộc chiến giữa nước Việt và nước Ngô. Trấn cổ Tây Đường được thành lập sau khi tướng Ngũ Tử Tư đào một con kênh để quân đội của ông có thể tiếp tế lương thực cho tiền tuyến.

SONY DSC

Trấn Tây Đường. (Ảnh: Sina)

Về sau, nó đã trở thành đường thủy nối liền giữa Thượng Hải, Chiết Giang và Giang Tô, được sử dụng cho mục đích hòa bình hơn. Trải qua nhiều thời đại, họ đã đào thêm rất nhiều con kênh, tạo thành 122 con lạch nhỏ với những ngôi nhà được được xây dựng trực tiếp trên mặt nước. Hầu hết việc giao thông và buôn bán đều diễn ra trên những con thuyền.

Tục ngữ địa phương có câu: “nước có nguồn gốc từ thời Xuân Thu, thị trấn xuất hiện từ thời Đường – Tống, nhà cửa có từ thời Minh – Thanh, và chỉ có con người là thuộc về ngày nay”.

A fisherman catches fish with his cormorants on a canal on January 31, 2006 in Xitang Township of Jiashan County, Zhejiang Province, southeast China. (China Photos/Getty Images)

Một ngư dân bắt cá cùng bầy chim cốc của ông trên một con kênh vào ngày 31/1/2006 tại Trấn Tây Đường, thuộc Gia Thiện, tỉnh Chiết Giang, đông nam Trung Quốc. (China Photos/Getty Images)

Mê cung Bát Quái

The Zhuge Bagua village. (via Sina)

Làng Bát Quái Gia Cát. (Ảnh: Sina)

Khi nhìn từ trên những ngọn đồi gần đó, làng Bát Quái tại Lan Khê, tỉnh Chiết Giang, trông giống như một tác phẩm nghệ thuật. Thị trấn với khoảng 4.000 cư dân này được xây dựng dựa trên hình dạng Bát quái của Đạo giáo, không nhằm mục đích thu hút khách du lịch.

Cách đây vài trăm năm trước, vào thời nhà Nguyên, ngôi làng này đã được kiến trúc sư Gia Cát Đại Sư thiết kế một cách cầu kỳ và tuyệt xảo. Trải qua nhiều năm, một số ngôi nhà đã bị đập bỏ và xây dựng lại, nhưng họ vẫn duy trì được 200 mẫu nhà có từ thời nhà Minh và nhà Thanh.

Trung tâm làng là một khu vực hình tròn phỏng theo hình tượng Thái Cực của Đạo giáo, với phần âm (phía tối) là một cái ao, và phần dương (phía sáng) là nền đất cứng.

Lấy hồ Thái Cực làm trung tâm, họ mở rộng thêm những con đường xuyên tâm chia ngôi làng thành 8 phần tương ứng với Bát quái. Bát quái là một công cụ được sử dụng trong việc tiên định và bói toán có từ thời cổ đại, tương truyền là do thần Phục Hy truyền lại.

Sight spots distribution map of Zhuge Bagua village. (via Sina)

Bản đồ phân bố các địa điểm ở làng Bát Quái Gia Cát. (Ảnh: Sina)

Cách thiết kế của Gia Cát Đại Sư dựa trên triết lý về sự hài hòa cũng như đảm bảo an ninh cho ngôi làng. Để cho cửa chính các ngôi nhà không đối diện với nhau, nhằm giúp cho các gia đình có thể duy trì một khoảng cách lành mạnh để tránh xung đột, Gia Cát Đại Sư đã bài trí các khu nhà thành từng đoạn có độ dài khác nhau. Đồng thời, cách bố trí của ngôi làng giống như một mê cung khiến cho người lạ dễ nhầm lẫn và ngăn không cho tội phạm từ bên ngoài [đột nhập vào]. Cấu trúc này cũng là một hình thức hỗ trợ phòng thủ tập thể.

Gia Cát Đại Sư là hậu duệ (đời thứ 28) của chiến lược gia bậc thầy Gia Cát Lượng – là người tu theo Đạo giáo, rất nổi tiếng với vai trò là nhà quân sự kiệt xuất trong thời Tam Quốc. Đa số người dân trong làng đều là hậu duệ của nhân vật huyền thoại này.

The Eight Trigrams emblem on one of walls in the village. (via Sina)

Biểu tượng Bát quái trên một bức tường trong làng. (Ảnh:Sina)

Cổ trấn không có bờ tường

Tọa lạc tại tỉnh Vân Nam ở biên giới phía nam của Trung Quốc, giáp ranh với Miến Điện và Ấn Độ, trấn cổ Lệ Giang là quê hương của đồng bào dân tộc thiểu số Nạp Tây, và rất nổi tiếng vì nó không có bờ tường.

Trấn cổ Lệ Giang có lịch sử từ thời nhà Nguyên, được UNESCO công nhận là Di sản Thế giới, nằm ở độ cao 2.400 mét so với mực nước biển (khoảng 8.000 feet). 1/3 cư dân của làng vẫn sinh sống bằng nghề thủ công truyền thống và sản xuất thương mại các vật liệu đồng, bạc, hoặc dệt vải và ủ rượu.

The old town of Lijiang. (via Ctrip)

Trấn cổ Lệ Giang. (Ảnh: Ctrip)

Kiến trúc ở Lệ Giang là sự pha trộn độc đáo giữa các phong cách Trung Quốc, Tây Tạng cùng với dân tộc Nạp Tây. Điểm nhấn nổi bật của trấn cổ này là tháp Ngũ Phượng cao 20 mét, được xây dựng năm 1601 vào thời nhà Minh.

The old town of Lijiang. (via chanyouji.cn)

Trấn cổ Lệ Giang. (Ảnh: chanyouji.cn)

Một tác phẩm vô cùng tráng lệ của Tây Tạng

Đa phần trong lịch sử Trung Quốc, Tây Tạng không phải là một phần lãnh thổ được cai trị bởi hoàng đế Trung Hoa, nó luôn được xem là một nước láng giềng hùng mạnh. Trong khi nền văn hóa và phong tục Tây Tạng phải chịu nhiều tàn phá trong thời cận đại, thì làng Độc Khắc Tông (Dorkhar) ở tỉnh Vân Nam lại chính là một kiểu mẫu hoàn chỉnh về một ngôi làng Tây Tạng còn tương đối nguyên vẹn.

Ngôi làng này được xây dựng vào thời nhà Đường cách đây khoảng 1.300 năm. Độc Khắc Tông nằm trên tuyến đường cổ kết nối giữa Vân Nam và Miến Điện, thông thương trà và muối. Ban đầu, nó được xây dựng với vai trò là chiến lũy quân sự cho quân đội Tây Tạng, và tên gọi của làng có nghĩa là “lâu đài được xây dựng trên nền đá”.

Dukezong town. (via Wikipedia)

Làng Độc Khắc Tông. (Ảnh: Wikipedia)

Một sản phẩm cổ xưa độc đáo của làng là một con dao bén đến mức có thể dễ dàng gọt đứt những cây đinh mà không hề sứt mẻ, theo một phóng sự do Đài Truyền hình Trung ương Trung Quốc trình chiếu.

Nhưng tiếc thay, vào năm 2014, một đám cháy lớn đã tàn phá làng Độc Khắc Tông và phá hủy hàng trăm ngôi nhà. Hiện nay ngôi làng đang được trùng tu và khôi phục lại.

Dukezong. (via Ctrip)

Làng Độc Khắc Tông. (Ảnh: Ctrip)

 

Dịch bởi: Qua Thất Chuân​

bài viết đặc sắc trong tháng 08/2017

4 giá trị cốt lõi trong chương trình học tiếng Anh tại trung tâm Anh ngữ CEP

Đây là những giá trị quan trọng nhất và cũng là những điều tâm huyết nhất mà chúng tôi, những người nhìn giáo dục như một quá trình tự học hỏi, tự thay đổi và hoàn thiện bản thân trước…

Có thể bạn quan tâm

Tin cùng chuyên mục