Tin song ngữ

  1. Tin tức song ngữ Anh-Việt
  2. Thời sự
  3. Thế giới
  4. Khả năng thực chiến của quân đội Trung Quốc

Khả năng thực chiến của quân đội Trung Quốc

27/03/2015
Mức nâng cao

How useful will China's weapons be in a real war?

When Hou Minjun, commander of an armored unit in the Chinese military's 27th Army, was ordered to drive his troops on a nine-day trip during a training exercise in Inner Mongolia, he lost over half his force in the event.

In the first 48 hours of the 2013 North Sword 1405 exercise, Hou looked on as all 40 tanks in his battalion broke down one after another.

Only 15 could be repaired and continue the 145-mile march, as reported by a People's Liberation Army (PLA) news service.

Despite simulating a noncombat situation, the battalion lost virtually all of its equipment in an experience that Hou, who has served for 32 years, described as "painful."

The North Sword 1405 debacle is indicative of the challenges facing China's officers.

Despite the Chinese regime's recent efforts to carry out broad changes and upgrades, many cracks in the PLA persist in the quality of its personnel training and equipment, according to experts and reports.

Obsolete and mismatched tanks   

Hou's experience in the North Sword exercise is not surprising. Of thousands of tanks currently in service with the PLA, the overwhelming majority are variants of the T-55, a Soviet design first produced shortly after World War ll.

Upgrades and retrofits have extended the lifespan of this successful weapon, but after over 60 years of service, the design simply does not fit in a modern arsenal.

Chinese People's Liberation Army cadets wash a tank at the PLA's Armored Forces Engineering Academy in Beijing on July 22, 2014. The vast majority of Chinese tanks are obsolete models.  (GREG BAKER/AFP/Getty Images)

Chinese People's Liberation Army cadets wash a tank at the PLA's Armored Forces Engineering Academy in Beijing on July 22, 2014. The vast majority of Chinese tanks are obsolete.
(GREG BAKER/AFP/Getty Images)

Particularly following the 1991 Gulf War, in which American aircraft and armor laid waste to thousands of Soviet and Chinese-built vehicles.

The PLA has been making new procurements and designing updated tanks, such as the ZTZ-99, which incorporates Western as well as Soviet design philosophies, to keep pace.

It might not be enough, however. According to a February report by War on the Rocks, a military analysis blog, what modernizations the PLA's armored forces have carried out may well be a hindrance, as they are far from comprehensive.

New equipment is trickled into service gradually, PLA armored units generally work with "multiple generations under one roof," to paraphrase from a Chinese proverb.

The slow, uncertain pace of upgrades force officers to frequently readjust their battle plans—a reality that, combined with the overall quality of PLA training, does not bode well for the force's prospects in a modern conflict.

Engine trouble

Air power is one field in which the Chinese regime has placed much attention, with mixed results. While of the PLA's aircraft, like its tanks, are old models such as the locally produced J-7 and J-8.

 China has added hundreds of fourth-generation—that is, designs from the late Cold War era—jets to its arsenal.

One example is the J-11 interceptor, a Chinese copy of the Soviet Su-27SK air superiority fighter.

The PLA's air force ordered this plane in 1992, and afterward began producing the J-11 locally with Russian-provided components, namely engines.

An armed Chinese J-11 fighter jet flies near an American patrol aircraft over the South China Sea in international airspace on Aug. 19, 2014. (U.S. Navy Photo/Released)

An armed Chinese J-11 fighter jet flies near an American patrol aircraft over the South China Sea in international airspace on Aug. 19, 2014. (U.S. Navy Photo/Released)

Following the collapse of the Soviet Union, the Chinese regime has been eager to purchase advanced weapons from the Russian government. This partnership has only partially borne fruit.

The Kremlin, wary of the Chinese propensity to steal and reverse-engineer foreign technology, has tended to guard its secrets carefully, leading to various abortive deals at the PLA's expense.

Hoping to wean themselves off the Russian-supplied engines that are essential for the PLA's modern air fleet, the Chinese have tried to produce their own engines for decades, fitting them into the J-11 and the locally designed J-10, which was also optimized to use a Russian engine.

The Chinese WS-10 jet engine, long in development as a local alternative to the PLA's J-11s, has consistently performed dubiously.

According to a report published on Globalsecurity.org, the Chinese military was unsatisfied with the engine in 2007, and in 2009 a Chinese official said there were still problems with the design.

Chinese fighter jets are reliant on Russian imports for their engines.

In 2010, the Washington Post reported that according to Russian and Chinese experts, the WS-10A engine needed servicing following just 30 hours of operation, as opposed to 400 hours for the Russian-produced engines, and far below international standards.

In 2013, the PLA's naval forces began deploying small numbers of the J-15, a carrier-based aircraft that, like the J-11, also comes from the Su-27 family.

Early models of this jet were fitted with Russian engines, but in 2010 it was announced that a Chinese-built engine, the WS-10H, would be used instead. As of 2012, however, they were still a weak point for the aircraft.

Whether or not this newest development of a home-grown Chinese engine has met expectations is unclear.

Regardless, an acceptable engine for the 4th generation Su-27 family does not translate into an engine suitable for the J-20, China's supposed 5th generation jet that is meant to match the American F-22 Raptor.

According to an article published on the "War is Boring" blog titled "The Chinese Military is a Paper Dragon," the J-20 won't be in service until 2021 at the earliest. 

The herculean task of training China's recruits

Even as China outfits its military with new weapons, its soldiers may not have sufficient know-how to use them properly. It takes time and effort to train personnel, and competence is needed to develop effective tactics and strategies.

A recent report titled "China's Incomplete Military Transformation," published by the RAND Corporation, analyzed personnel deficiencies in many sectors of the PLA, including the 2nd Artillery Corps, which controls China's nuclear weapons.

According to a report by the Project 2049 Institute think tank, in the summer of 2012, 2nd Artillery personnel conducting a 15-day military exercise in an underground bunker complex could not hold out to the end.

About halfway through the drill the personnel were so distraught that female troops from a PLA "cultural performance troupe" had to be brought in to cheer them up.

Theorizing that young men were not suited for long subterranean shifts, the 2nd Artillery tried a shortened, three-day-long version of the exercise—this time with women.

The results were even more disappointing. A sizable portion of the personnel had to receive psychological counselling by the second day, and some even refused to eat.

Halfway through the drill the personnel were so distraught that female troops had to be brought in to cheer them up.

China maintains a large fleet of submarines, including nuclear-powered subs carrying ballistic missiles, but among the five nations on the United Nation Security Council, only the Chinese have yet to send their nuclear missile subs on an operational patrol.

In a high-profile case from 2003, a Chinese diesel-powered submarine sank with all hands, revealing the poor state of training and maintenance in the PLA's naval forces.

Raised under the restrictive one-child policy, 80 percent of the PLA's combat troops are only children who grew up receiving the exclusive attention of their parents and grandparents, a Chinese general told The New York Times.

Molding them into soldiers capable of following orders and cooperating in a highly collectivist military environment may be a challenge. Scott W. Harold, one of the authors of the RAND report told the New York Times that "kids come into the army who are used to being coddled and the apple of their parents' eyes."

Chinese People's Liberation Army cadets conduct bayonet drills at the PLA's Armored Forces Engineering Academy in Beijing on July 22, 2014. (GREG BAKER/AFP/Getty Images)

Chinese People's Liberation Army cadets conduct bayonet drills at the PLA's Armored Forces Engineering Academy in Beijing on July 22, 2014. (GREG BAKER/AFP/Getty Images)

The quality and utility of PLA training exercises is a subject of frequent criticism from and directed at Chinese officers.

Exercises are often rigged by commanders attempting to impress their superiors, and military publications point at excessive "formalism" in training.

Overall, the PLA has often found itself hard-pressed to simulate the realistic environments that would reveal weaknesses in its military doctrine and provide planners opportunities to improve.

In addition to requiring more funds for fuel, ammunition, and other supplies needed for improved training, the PLA faces a systemic roadblock that lies in its founding nature, that is, its role as the armed wing of the Chinese Communist Party.

Under the party's leadership

To keep the "gun" under the control of the CCP, the PLA had to be subordinated to the Party and kept away from Chinese civil oversight. Communist ideology pervades all levels of the PLA.

According to a report by the Sinodefense news website, officers spend over a third of their time engaging in "political work," a term for ideological meetings, study sessions, and indoctrination.

All Chinese career officers are Communist Party members, and all units larger than a platoon are supervised by a political officer to ensure that Party discipline is maintained. At the top levels of the PLA, key decisions are made by political committees.

The heavily politicized nature of the PLA, as well as the fact that the Communist Party keeps it in relative seclusion from civil agencies, contributes to severe corruption in its organization.

Like the Party, the PLA operates largely above the law—embezzlement and illicit business are common among Chinese officers.

Recent anti-corruption efforts by current Chinese regime leaders have disciplined thousands of military personnel for their vices. The most prominent senior officer to fall under investigation is Xu Caihou, former vice chairman of the Central Military Commission and director of the General Political Department.

Despite his prominent rank, which he held since the early 2000s, Xu never commanded a specific military unit and spent his entire career in the General Political Department.

Among the charges levied against him was the acceptance of bribes in exchange for promotions. During the investigation, the general was found to have been in possession of vast hoards of hard cash and precious gems.

By Leo TimmEpoch Times 

 

 

Quân đội Trung Quốc có khả năng thực chiến?

Ông Hầu Mẫn Tuấn là chỉ huy của một đơn vị thiết giáp thuộc Binh đoàn 27 của quân đội Trung Quốc. Khi được lệnh phải lãnh đạo đơn vị của mình tham gia một cuộc hành quân kéo dài 9 ngày trong cuộc tập trận huấn luyện ở Nội Mông Cổ, ông Hầu đã bị tổn thất hơn một nửa lực lượng của mình.

Trong vòng 48 giờ đầu tiên của cuộc tập trận Bắc Kiếm 1405 năm 2013, ông Hầu chỉ biết đứng nhìn khi tất cả 40 chiếc xe tăng trong tiểu đoàn của ông bị hỏng từng chiếc một.

Theo báo cáo của một hãng tin của Quân đội Giải phóng Nhân dân Trung Quốc (PLA), chỉ có 15 chiếc xe tăng trên là có thể sửa được và tiếp tục cuộc hành quân dài 145 dặm.

Mặc dù đây mới chỉ là mô phỏng một tình huống không chiến đấu, tiểu đoàn này đã mất hầu như tất cả các thiết bị của mình. Đối với một người phục vụ trong ngành 32 năm như ông Hầu, đây quả là một trải nghiệm "đau đớn".

Sự thất bại của cuộc tập trận Bắc Kiếm 1405 bộc lộ những thách thức mà các sỹ quan Trung Quốc đang phải đối mặt.

Các chuyên gia và các báo cáo cho biết, mặc dù chính quyền Trung Quốc gần đây đã nỗ lực tiến hành đổi mới và nâng cấp với quy mô lớn, vẫn còn tồn tại nhiều vấn đề trong chất lượng huấn luyện và chất lượng thiết bị của lực lượng quân đội Trung Quốc.

Những chiếc xe tăng lỗi thời

Trải nghiệm của ông Hầu trong buổi tập trận Bắc Kiếm không có gì đáng ngạc nhiên. Trong hàng ngàn chiếc xe tăng đang được sử dụng trong lực lượng quân đội Trung Quốc, đại đa số là các xe cải tiến từ loại xe T-55, một thiết kế của Liên Xô được sản xuất lần đầu tiên ngay sau chiến tranh thế giới thứ II.

Hoạt động nâng cấp và sửa đổi đã kéo dài tuổi thọ của loại vũ khí một thời thành công này, nhưng sau hơn 60 năm phục vụ, loại xe này đã không còn xứng tầm so với các loại vũ khí hiện đại được nữa.

Một học viên sỹ quan Quân đội Giải phóng Nhân dân Trung Quốc (PLA) đang rửa xe tăng tại Học viện Kỹ thuật Thiết giáp của PLA tại Bắc Kinh vào ngày 22/7/2014. Đại đa số các xe tăng của Trung Quốc đã lỗi thời. (GREG BAKER / AFP / Getty Images)

Một học viên sỹ quan Quân đội Giải phóng Nhân dân Trung Quốc (PLA) đang rửa xe tăng tại Học viện Kỹ thuật Thiết giáp của PLA tại Bắc Kinh vào ngày 22/7/2014. Đại đa số các xe tăng của Trung Quốc đã lỗi thời. (GREG BAKER / Getty Images)

Đặc biệt sau cuộc Chiến tranh vùng Vịnh năm 1991, lực lượng máy bay và thiết giáp của Mỹ đã phá hủy hàng ngàn phương tiện vận chuyển do Liên Xô và Trung Quốc sản xuất.

Quân đội Trung Quốc đã bắt đầu tiến hành những đợt mua sắm mới và thiết kế các loại xe tăng hiện đại để bắt kịp sự phát triển; chẳng hạn như chiếc ZTZ-99, trong đó kết hợp các quan điểm thiết kế kiểu phương Tây và của Liên Xô.

Tuy nhiên, như vậy vẫn chưa đủ. Theo một báo cáo tháng 2 của trang blog phân tích quân sự mang tênWar on the Rocks, công cuộc hiện đại hóa lực lượng thiết giáp mà quân đội Trung Quốc tiến hành cũng có thể là một trở ngại, vì chúng rất thiếu toàn diện.

Các thiết bị mới được đưa vào sử dụng dần dần, các đơn vị thiết giáp Trung Quốc thường phải thao tác "cùng lúc với nhiều thế hệ thiết bị". Tiến độ cập nhật chậm chạp, không ổn định khiến các sỹ quan phải thường xuyên điều chỉnh lại kế hoạch chiến đấu của họ.

Đây là một thực tế không cho thấy triển vọng tốt đẹp gì đối với lực lượng quân đội Trung Quốc trong trường hợp xảy ra xung đột.

Khó khăn về động cơ

Sức mạnh không quân là một trong những lĩnh vực mà chính quyền Trung Quốc rất chú trọng nhưng lại có kết quả khác nhau. Cũng giống như các xe loại tăng, các máy bay của quân đội Trung Quốc đều là các kiểu cũ, chẳng hạn như loại máy bay J-7 và J-8 được sản xuất trong nước.

Trung Quốc đã bổ sung vào kho vũ khí của mình hàng trăm chiếc máy bay thế hệ thứ tư, tức là, những chiếc được cải tiến từ máy bay phản lực ở cuối thời kỳ Chiến tranh Lạnh.

Đơn cử như máy bay đánh chặn J-11, một phiên bản mà Trung Quốc nhái lại từ máy bay chiến đấu ưu việt trên không Su-27SK của Liên Xô.

Lực lượng không quân của quân đội Trung Quốc đã đặt mua máy bay này vào năm 1992, và sau đó bắt đầu sản xuất loại J-11 trong nước với các bộ phận do Nga cung cấp, cụ thể là các động cơ.

Một chiếc máy bay phản lực chiến đấu có vũ trang J-11 của Trung Quốc đang bay gần một máy bay tuần tra của Mỹ trên Biển Đông trong không phận quốc tế vào ngày 19/8/2014. (Ảnh: US Navy Photo)

Một chiếc máy bay phản lực chiến đấu có vũ trang J-11 của Trung Quốc đang bay gần một máy bay tuần tra của Mỹ trên Biển Đông trong không phận quốc tế vào ngày 19/8/2014. (Ảnh: US Navy Photo)

Sau sự sụp đổ của Liên Xô, chính quyền Trung Quốc háo hức mua các vũ khí tiên tiến từ chính phủ Nga. Sự hợp tác này để lại hậu quả cho một bên.

Điện Kremlin đã có đường hướng bảo vệ bí mật kỹ thuật của mình một cách cẩn thận do cảnh giác với xu hướng ăn cắp và làm nhái công nghệ nước ngoài của Trung Quốc. Điều này dẫn đến nhiều giao dịch thất bại khác nhau mà thiệt hại thuộc về phía quân đội Trung Quốc.

Với hy vọng từ bỏ lệ thuộc vào động cơ do Nga cung cấp — một điều rất cần thiết cho hạm đội máy bay hiện đại của quân đội Trung Quốc — trong nhiều thập kỷ, người Trung Quốc đã cố gắng tự sản xuất động cơ cho riêng mình sau đó lắp những động cơ này vào máy bay J-11 và máy bay tự chế J-10, loại máy bay từng dùng động cơ của Nga.

Động cơ máy bay phản lực của Trung Quốc WS-10, được nghiên cứu trong thời gian khá lâu dài để thay thế cho những máy bay J-11 của quân đội Trung Quốc, tuy nhiên động cơ này liên tiếp có trục trặc.

Theo một báo cáo được công bố trên Globalsecurity.org, quân đội Trung Quốc đã bất mãn với động cơ này từ năm 2007, và vào năm 2009, một quan chức Trung Quốc cho biết vẫn còn có những vấn đề về mẫu thiết kế này.

Các máy bay chiến đấu của Trung Quốc phụ thuộc vào động cơ được nhập khẩu từ Nga.

Năm 2010, hãng tin Washington Post đưa tin rằng theo các chuyên gia Nga và Trung Quốc thì chỉ sau 30 giờ hoạt động là động cơ WS-10A đã cần được bảo dưỡng, trái ngược hẳn với 400 giờ đối với các động cơ do Nga sản xuất, và kém xa so với các tiêu chuẩn quốc tế.

Vào năm 2013, lực lượng hải quân của quân đội Trung Quốc đã bắt đầu triển khai một số ít máy bay J-15, một loại máy bay hoạt động trên tàu sân bay, cũng được chế từ dòng máy bay Su-27 như J-11.

Các mẫu đầu tiên của máy bay phản lực này từng được trang bị động cơ của Nga, nhưng vào năm 2010, có tuyên bố cho biết động cơ WS-10H do Trung Quốc chế tạo sẽ được dùng để thay thế. Tuy nhiên, tính đến năm 2012,  động cơ vẫn là là một điểm yếu đối với loại máy bay này.

Không rõ liệu cải tiến mới nhất của loại động cơ mà Trung Quốc tự sản xuất có đáp ứng được kỳ vọng của nước này hay không.

Dù sao đi nữa, kể cả nếu động cơ dùng được cho thế hệ thứ 4 của Su-27, điều đó không có nghĩa là nó cũng phù hợp đối với loại J-20, loại máy bay phản lực thế hệ thứ 5 của Trung Quốc nhằm bắt kịp loại F-22 Raptor của Mỹ.

Theo một bài báo được công bố trên trang blog mang tên "Chiến tranh thật tẻ nhạt" có tiêu đề "Quân đội Trung Quốc là một con rồng giấy", chiếc J-20 sẽ chưa được đưa vào sử dụng ít nhất là đến năm 2021.

Khó khăn trong việc huấn luyện tân binh

Ngay cả nếu Trung Quốc trang bị được các vũ khí mới cho lực lượng quân đội, binh lính của họ chưa chắc đã có đủ kiến ​​thức để sử dụng các vũ khí này. Phải mất thời gian và công sức để đào tạo được đội ngũ sỹ quan cũng như năng lực cần thiết để phát triển chiến thuật và chiến lược hiệu quả.

Một báo cáo gần đây có tựa đề "Sự chuyển đổi lực lượng quân đội thiếu hoàn thiện của Trung Quốc", do tổ chức RAND công bố, đã phân tích sự thiếu hụt nhân sự trong nhiều lĩnh vực của quân đội Trung Quốc, bao gồm cả lực lượng pháo binh 2 kiểm soát vũ khí hạt nhân của Trung Quốc.

Theo một báo cáo của cơ quan tư vấn Viện Dự án 2049 vào mùa hè năm 2012, lực lượng pháo binh 2 đã tiến hành một cuộc tập trận 15 ngày trong một khu hầm ngầm nhưng không thể cầm cự đến ngày cuối cùng.

Đến giữa kỳ tập trận, binh lính đã quá quẫn trí đến mức họ phải cử một tiểu đội lính nữ từ một "Đoàn biểu diễn văn hóa" của quân đội Trung Quốc đến để khích lệ tinh thần.

Với suy nghĩ rằng những người lính trẻ không phù hợp với những kỳ huấn luyện dài ngày dưới mặt đất, lực lượng pháo binh 2 đã rút ngắn thời gian và thử phiên bản huấn luyện ba ngày, lần này có cả phụ nữ đi kèm.

Các kết quả thậm chí còn đáng thất vọng hơn. Một lượng đáng kể binh lính phải tư vấn tâm lý vào ngày thứ hai, một số khác thậm chí còn không chịu ăn.

Đến giữa kỳ tập trận, binh lính đã quá quẫn trí đến mức họ phải cử một tiểu đội lính nữ đến để khích lệ tinh thần.

Trung Quốc duy trì một hạm đội lớn các tàu ngầm, bao gồm cả tàu ngầm nguyên tử mang tên lửa đạn đạo, nhưng trong số năm quốc gia trong Hội đồng Bảo an Liên hợp quốc, chỉ có người Trung Quốc vẫn chưa gửi tàu ngầm tên lửa hạt nhân của họ cho đội tuần tra hoạt động.

Có một vụ việc nổi tiếng xảy ra vào năm 2003, chiếc tàu ngầm chạy bằng diesel của Trung Quốc đã chìm cùng tất cả những người trên tàu. Sự việc này đã bộc lộ tình trạng đào tạo và bảo trì nghèo nàn trong lực lượng hải quân của quân đội Trung Quốc.

Một vị đại tướng của Trung Quốc cho biết trên tờ New York Times rằng, dưới chính sách một con hà khắc của Trung Quốc, 80% quân chiến đấu của quân đội Trung Quốc là con trai độc nhất lớn lên trong sự quan tâm bao bọc của cha mẹ và ông bà.

Việc mài dũa họ thành những người lính biết tuân lệnh và hợp tác trong một môi trường quân sự tập thể có thể là một thách thức lớn. Ông Scott W. Harold, một trong những tác giả của báo cáo RAND phát biểu với New York Times rằng "Trước khi gia nhập quân đội các thanh niên đều được cha mẹ nuông chiều như những đứa trẻ".

Học viên sĩ quan Quân đội Giải phóng Nhân dân Trung Quốc tiến hành tập đâm lưỡi lê tại Học viện Kỹ thuật Thiết giáp của PLA tại Bắc Kinh vào ngày 22/7/2014. (GREG BAKER / AFP / Getty Images)

Học viên sĩ quan Quân đội Giải phóng Nhân dân Trung Quốc tiến hành tập đâm lưỡi lê tại Học viện Kỹ thuật Thiết giáp của PLA tại Bắc Kinh vào ngày 22/7/2014. (GREG BAKER / Getty Images)

Chất lượng và tính thiết thực trong các buổi huấn luyện của quân đội Trung Quốc là một chủ đề thường xuyên được đưa ra chỉ trích giữa các sĩ quan Trung Quốc.

Những người chỉ huy thường gian lận trong các buổi huấn luyện nhằm cố gắng gây ấn tượng với cấp trên, các ấn phẩm quân sự cũng đã chỉ ra tính "hình thức" quá mức trong hoạt động huấn luyện.

Nhìn chung, quân đội Trung Quốc thường xuyên ở trong tình cảnh thực tế bị giả tạo, không bộc lộ nhiều điểm yếu trong học thuyết quân sự và chẳng thể giúp các nhà hoạch định có cơ hội để cải thiện.

Ngoài việc đòi hỏi nhiều ngân sách hơn nữa cho nhiên liệu, đạn dược và các vật tư khác cần thiết cho việc cải thiện huấn luyện, quân đội Trung Quốc còn phải đối mặt với một rào cản mang tính hệ thống, nằm trong bản chất tự nhiên ngay từ khi nó được thành lập, xuất phát từ vai trò làm lực lượng vũ trang cho Đảng Cộng sản Trung Quốc.

Dưới sự lãnh đạo của Đảng

Để giữ cho "nòng súng" nằm dưới sự kiểm soát của ĐCSTQ, quân đội Trung Quốc đã phải lệ thuộc vào Đảng và rời xa việc giám sát dân sự trên đất nước Trung Quốc. Ý thức hệ cộng sản tràn ngập trong tất cả các cấp của quân đội Trung Quốc. 

Theo một báo cáo của trang tin tức Sinodefense, các sỹ quan Trung Quốc dành hơn 1/3 thời gian của họ tham gia vào "công tác chính trị"—một thuật ngữ ám chỉ các cuộc họp về ý thức hệ, học nghị quyết và nhồi sọ.

Tất cả các sĩ quan chuyên nghiệp Trung Quốc đều là đảng viên ĐCSTQ, tất cả các đơn vị lớn hơn trung đội đều được giám sát bởi một sĩ quan chính trị để đảm bảo rằng kỷ luật Đảng được duy trì. Ở cấp hàng đầu của quân đội Trung Quốc, các quyết định quan trọng được thực hiện bởi các Ủy ban Chính trị.

Bản chất chính trị nặng nề của quân đội Trung Quốc, cũng như thực tế rằng ĐCSTQ giữ quân đội tách khỏi các cơ quan dân sự, đã góp phần vào nạn tham nhũng nghiêm trọng trong cơ cấu tổ chức của quân đội.

Giống như Đảng, quân đội Trung Quốc hoạt động rộng rãi bên trên luật pháp — nạn biển thủ và kinh doanh bất hợp pháp rất phổ biến trong các sỹ quan của Trung Quốc.

Những nỗ lực chống tham nhũng gần đây của các nhà lãnh đạo hiện hành của Trung Quốc đã xử lý kỷ luật hàng ngàn quan chức quân đội với đủ loại tệ nạn. Quan chức quân đội cao cấp nổi bật nhất bị tiến hành điều tra là ông Từ Tài Hậu, cựu Phó Chủ tịch Quân ủy Trung ương kiêm Cục trưởng Tổng cục Chính trị.

Bất chấp thứ hạng nổi bật mà ông ta nắm giữ kể từ đầu những năm 2000, ông Từ Tài Hậu không bao giờ chỉ huy một đơn vị quân sự cụ thể nào mà dành toàn bộ sự nghiệp của mình ở Tổng cục Chính trị.

Một trong những cáo buộc dành cho ông ta là việc nhận hối lộ để thăng chức. Quá trình điều tra đã phát hiện vị đại tướng này sở hữu những kho tàng lớn về tiền mặt và đá quý.

Dịch bởi: Nguyên

bài viết đặc sắc trong tháng 12/2016

Lớp học IELTS vào sáng Chủ Nhật cho học viên có khả năng tự học | Học phí 600.000đ/tháng

Đây là chương trình học luyện thi IELTS dành cho các bạn có khả năng tự học tiếng Anh tại nhà với sự hướng dẫn của thầy Ce Phan vào chiều thứ 7 hoặc buổi sáng Chủ Nhật hàng tuần…

Có thể bạn quan tâm

Tin cùng chuyên mục