Tin song ngữ

  1. Tin tức song ngữ Anh-Việt
  2. Khoa học - Công nghệ
  3. Khoa học - Nghiên cứu
  4. Khi những bóng ma cố tình giết bạn trong giấc ngủ (Hiện tượng bóng đè)

Khi những bóng ma cố tình giết bạn trong giấc ngủ (Hiện tượng bóng đè)

09/06/2017
Mức trung cấp

When Ghosts Try to Kill You In Your Sleep

"The Nightmare" lukisan John Henry Fuseli

An investigation into Southeast Asian beliefs about sleep paralysis.

In Indonesia, it goes by many names: rep-repaneureup-eureup, and tindihan. The Hmong people of Vietnam and Laos call it dab tsong. In Cambodia, it's khmaoch sângkât. In every country, there's a common thread that runs through local explanations of what Western doctors call "sleep paralysis": it's the work of some kind of spirit, or, to translate the Khmer phrase, it's literally "a ghost pushing down on you."

It's something I've suffered from my whole life. A lot of Indonesians sleep away the hunger and thirst that comes from fasting for Ramadan. Not me. To others, sleeping might is probably this restful thing, but for me it can be exhausting.

Nearly every time I fall asleep I end up waking up with a jolt. But "waking up" isn't exactly the right phrase because I'm not exactly conscious. I'm somewhere in-between instead, in that weird and sometimes scary space between sleep and awake. I lay there unable to move but totally aware of my surroundings. And want to hear the most-fucked up part? I swear that I can see something black get up off my body and walk through the wall next to my bed. I can feel some weird otherworldly warmth leaving my body.

This has happened nearly every night, sometimes 20 times in a night, since I was six years old.

"I was horrified. I couldn't tell if it was real or a nightmare. I couldn't move. I freaked out." —Mirella Pandjaitan

So what the hell is it? Some Indonesians believe sleep paralysis is the work of jin—spirits or ghosts named in the Quran as one of God's smartest creations. Jin aren't always malevolent, but they are spirits and that still makes them pretty damn frightening if you ask me.

Four years ago Mirella Pandjaitan, 22, experienced sleep paralysis for the first time in her life. She immediately thought of evil spirits.

"I was horrified," Mirella told me. "I couldn't tell if it was real or a nightmare. I couldn't move. I freaked out. Back then I didn't think it was sleep paralysis because I wasn't familiar with the term. I thought a bad spirit had tried to bother me because I too have experienced waking up [to see a ghost]. I couldn't go back to sleep."

"You experience hallucinations, you can see some sort of creature, but the form this creature takes really depends in your cultural background. That's why different people in different parts of the world see different things." —Andreas Prasadja

Knowing I wasn't alone was a bit of a relief, but it wasn't much. I needed to get to the bottom of this to figure out if I will ever get the chance to have a good night's sleep this Ramadan. So I got in touch with Andreas Prasadja, the country's only sleep disorder specialist. He explained that disorders like sleep paralysis can get worse when you're fasting.

"People who are fasting experience a shift in their biological clock, they're lacking sleep," he told me. "And in extreme cases, sleep deprivation could trigger sleep paralysis."

I met Andreas at Mitra Hospital in Kemayoran, Central Jakarta, where he runs a sleep disorder clinic. I went through my experiences with him. Andreas nodded then told me what was behind by nightly ghost visits.

When we're in the REM, or rapid eye movement, phase of sleep, we're most at-risk for suffering from sleep paralysis. It occurs when there is an overlap between REM sleep and wakeful brainwaves, Andreas explained.

"There are two characteristics of sleep paralysis," he told me. "The first is you experience hallucinations, you can see some sort of creature, but the form this creature takes really depends in your cultural background. That's why different people in different parts of the world see different things."

Here in Southeast Asia, we see ghosts. In the US, a lot of sleep paralysis suffers see spiders. My editor, an American, told me he sees kittens instead (aww).

The second characteristic of sleep paralysis is what gives it its name.

"You're unable to move you body due to your neural defense mechanisms," Andreas said. "So yeah, you're inability to move is a defense mechanism."

"My Dream, My Bad Dream," by Fritz Schwimbeck

US doctors started to study Southeast Asian experiences with sleep paralysis when refugees from Cambodia, Laos, and Vietnam began to arrive in the country. Cambodia refugees, struggling with the trauma of surviving the Khmer Rouge's death camps, were complaining of khmaoch sângkât. The suddenly, in the early 80s, more than 100 otherwise healthy Hmong men died in their sleep. No one could understand what was going on. Doctors decided to call it Sudden Unexplained Nocturnal Death Syndrome or SUNDS.

And then, just as sudden as it appeared, the deaths stopped. More than two decades later a professor from the University of California, San Francisco, came to a chilling conclusion: the Hmong people's belief in the night spirit, or dab tsong, is what killed them.

Well, sort of. Technically it was likely a heart defect that caused their deaths. But sleep paralysis, and their own local beliefs on what was causing it, also played a vital role, Adler argued in her book Sleep Paralysis: Night-mares, Nocebos, and the Mind Body Connection.

Halfway across the country, a cardiologist at the Baylor College of Medicine, in Texas, was looking into alleged connections between SUNDS, REM sleep, and sleep paralysis. The doctor, Matteo Vatta, found that Southeast Asian men were predisposed to a genetic heart arrhythmia that was possibly behind the deaths of the Hmong men back in the 80s.

"The heart can be normal for quite some time, and then it may stop unexpectedly," Vatta told the blog LiveScience. "Usually, the heart stops at night, and in Southeast Asia it once caused more deaths amongst young males than car accidents."

"In Indonesia we believe in the unseen world. We never said that the unseen is separate from our lives, so we take it as fact that something that can happen at any moment." —Risa Permandeli

But don't worry, SUNDS and rep-repan aren't the same thing. It's just a common problem and it's best to ignore it when it happens to you, Andreas told me.

"It can't harm us when it's happening, but it does have bad implications," he said. "I mean, [sleep paralysis] is a sign that someone's extremely sleep deprived. So if you're driving car or motorcycle under that condition, it could be fatal, no?"

The Hmong men were likely terrified when it happened to them. So Andreas' advice? Stay calm and go back to sleep.

"Just don't fight it, it's exhausting," he said. "Just go back to sleep. Everything is OK, even though it seems and feels terrifying."

It's not just Southeast Asians who find the whole experience frightening. The word "nightmare" allegedly comes from the Norse term "mare"—a supernatural spirit or power that likes to crush people's chests or choke them when they sleep.

In Indonesia, beliefs tend to be passed down from generation to generation, so it's no surprise that some weird old ideas about evil ghosts are still popular today. Or is it not that weird at all? Science is great and all, but what if that dark figure I see at night really is a ghost?

I contacted Risa Permandeli, an expert in Indonesian ghosts and mysticism, to ask why these beliefs were still so prevalent in Indonesia.

"Our people just accepts the information it get, and they never change their views," she said. "There have not been any efforts to counter the idea or verify it. We're never preoccupied by the notion that we need to verify something."

And in a country where there is a widespread belief in the supernatural, ghost stories and old-fashioned lore persist.

"In Indonesia we believe in the unseen world," Risa told me. "We never said that the unseen is separate from our lives, so we take it as fact that something that can happen at any moment.

"I think anywhere in the world, even in France where the people known to be rational, there's a concept of the unseen world. In its development, in West Europe the belief of an unseen world stopped when they discovered rationalism. Here, there's no such thing as knowledge-based rationalism, so our traditions and myths live on."

Source: ARZIA TIVANY WARGADIREDJA (VICE)

 

Khi những bóng ma cố tình giết bạn trong giấc ngủ

"Ác mộng" của lukisan John Henry Fuseli

Một cuộc nghiên cứu về quan niệm của người Đông Nam Á về tình trạng tê liệt khi ngủ.

Ở Indonesia, bóng đè được biết đến với rất nhiều tên gọi: rep-repan, eureup và tindihan. Người Hmông ở Việt Nam và người Lào gọi nó là dab tsong trong khi người Campuchia gọi là khmaoch sângkât. Mỗi quốc gia thường lưu truyền trong dân gian cách giải thích của người dân về hiện tượng mà các bác sĩ phương tây gọi là "tình trạng tê liệt khi ngủ": nó do một thế lực tâm linh nào đó gây ra, hay theo nghĩa đen trong tiếng Khơ-me nó là "một con quỷ đang đè lên người bạn".

Đó là điều tôi đã phải chịu đựng trong suốt cuộc đời của mình. Rất nhiều người Indonesia đi ngủ cho qua cơn đói và khát trong suốt tháng ăn chay Ramadan. Tôi thì không. Đối với người khác, giấc ngủ có vẻ là cách nghỉ ngơi thích hợp nhất, nhưng với tôi thì nó thật mệt mỏi.

Gần như mỗi khi vừa thiêm thiếp ngủ tôi đều giật mình tỉnh giấc. Nhưng "tỉnh giấc" ở đây không phải là một cụm từ được dùng chính xác bởi vì tôi không hoàn toàn nhận thức được điều đó. Tôi lơ lửng đâu đó trong không gian kì lạ và đôi khi đáng sợ giữa tỉnh và mê. Tôi nằm bất động không thể di chuyển nhưng hoàn toàn nhận thức được những việc xung quanh. Bạn muốn biết phần hỗn loạn nhất không? Tôi thề là tôi có thể nhìn thấy thứ gì đó màu đen bật dậy khỏi cơ thể mình và đi xuyên qua bức tường cạnh giường ngủ. Tôi còn cảm nhận được hơi ấm tâm linh kì lạ rời khỏi cơ thể mình.

Chuyện này xuất hiện hầu như mỗi đêm, có đêm lên đến 20 lần từ khi tôi 6 tuổi.

"Tôi đã rất hoảng loạn. Tôi không thể xác định được nó là thực hay chỉ là một cơn ác mộng. Tôi không thể cử động, thật sự rất đáng sợ." - Mirella Pandjaitan

Vậy nó là cái quái gì? Một vài người Indonesia tin rằng bóng đè do jin - các hồn ma hay quỷ dữ được đặt tên theo kinh Koran như một trong những tạo vật thông minh nhất của chúa trời. Jin không phải lúc nào cũng xấu xa, nhưng suy cho cùng chúng vẫn là những hồn ma và điều đó khiến chúng trở nên khá đáng sợ.

Bốn năm trước, Mirella Pandjaitan (22 tuổi) đã trải nghiệm cảm giác bóng đè lần đầu tiên trong đời mình. Cô ngay lập tức tưởng tượng ra hình ảnh những bóng ma quỷ dữ.

Mirella tâm sự "Tôi đã rất hoảng loạn. Tôi không thể xác định được nó là thực hay chỉ là một cơn ác mộng. Tôi không thể cử động, thật sự rất đáng sợ. Lúc đó tôi không biết đó là hiện tượng bóng đè vì thuật ngữ này còn khá xa lạ với tôi. Tôi nghĩ một linh hồn xấu xa nào đó đang cố quấy rầy tôi bởi vì tôi đã trải qua quá nhiều lần tỉnh giấc (để nhìn thấy một con ma). Sau đó tôi chẳng thể nào ngủ lại được nữa.

Bạn đang bị ảo giác, bạn có thể nhìn thấy một sinh vật nào đó, và hình dáng của sinh vật đó ra sao thật sự tùy thuộc vào nền văn hóa nơi bạn sinh sống. Đó là lý do tại sao những người ở những nơi khác nhau trên thế giới nhìn thấy những thứ khác nhau." - Andreas Prasadja

Có một chút nhẹ nhõm khi biết rằng không phải chỉ có mình tôi mắc phải tình trạng trên, nhưng nhiêu đó là chưa đủ. Tôi cần tìm hiểu đến tận cùng để biết liệu tôi có thể có một giấc ngủ ngon trong tháng Ramadan này không. Vì vậy tôi đã liên lạc với Andreas Prasadja, vị chuyên gia về rối loạn giấc ngủ duy nhất trong nước. Ông ấy giải thích rằng những rối loạn khi ngủ như bóng đè có thể trầm trọng thêm khi bạn nhịn đói.

Ông nói với tôi: "Những người nhịn đói phải thay đổi đồng hồ sinh học của mình, họ thiếu ngủ. Và trong một vài trường hợp nghiêm trọng, tình trạng thiếu ngủ có thể gây nên tình trạng tê liệt khi ngủ."

Tôi gặp Andreas tại bệnh viện Mitra ở Kemayoran, trung tâm Jakarta, nơi ông đang điều hành một phòng khám về rối loạn giấc ngủ. Tôi kể cho ông nghe về những trải nghiệm của mình. Andreas gật đầu và nói cho tôi biết điều gì ẩn đằng sau những chuyến viếng thăm của quỷ dữ hằng đêm.

Khi chúng ta đang trong trạng thái REM (ngủ mơ) hay chuyển động mắt nhanh - một giai đoạn của giấc ngủ, chúng ta có nguy cơ gặp tình trạng tê liệt khi ngủ. Nó xảy ra khi có sự chồng chéo giữa giai đoạn ngủ REM và sóng não tỉnh táo - Andreas giải thích.

"Chứng tê liệt khi ngủ có 2 đặc điểm," ông ấy nói với tôi. "Đầu tiên bạn sẽ gặp ảo giác, bạn có thể nhìn thấy một sinh vật nào đó, và hình dáng của sinh vật đó ra sao thật sự tùy thuộc vào nền văn hóa nơi bạn sinh sống. Đó là lý do tại sao những người ở những nơi khác nhau trên thế giới nhìn thấy những thứ khác nhau."

Tại vùng Đông Nam Á này chúng ta nhìn thấy những bóng ma. Còn ở Mỹ, rất nhiều người gặp tình trạng tê liệt khi ngủ nhìn thấy nhền nhện. Trong khi đó biên tập viên người Mỹ của tôi nói rằng anh ta nhìn thấy những con mèo con (awww).

Đặc điểm thứ hai của tình trạng tê liệt khi ngủ đúng với tên gọi của nó.

"Bạn không thể di chuyển cơ thể vì cơ chế bảo vệ thần kinh," Andreas nói. "Và vâng, việc bạn không tài nào di chuyển được là một cơ chế bảo vệ."

"Giấc mơ của tôi, cơn ác mộng của tôi" do Fritz Schwimbeck vẽ

Các bác sĩ ở Mỹ bắt đầu nghiên cứu về tình trạng tê liệt khi ngủ của người Đông Nam Á khi những người tị nạn từ Campuchia, Lào và Việt Nam đến đất nước này. Những người tị nạn Campuchia phải vật lộn với chấn thương để tồn tại trong các khu trại tử thần của người Khơ-me Đỏ than phiền về khmaoch sângkât. Vào đầu những năm 80, đột nhiên có hơn 100 nam giới Hmông khỏe mạnh chết trong khi ngủ. Không một ai có thể hiểu nổi điều gì đang xảy ra. Các bác sĩ đã quyết định gọi nó là Hội chứng đột tử bí ẩn về đêm (SUNDS).

Và sau đó, cũng đột ngột như khi xuất hiện, những cái chết dừng lại. Hơn hai thập kỉ sau đó một giáo sư từ đại học California (San Francisco) đưa ra kết luận ớn lạnh: chính những quan niệm của người Hmông về các linh hồn ban đêm, hay dab tsong đã giết chết họ.

Vâng, xét về mặt kĩ thuật, có vẻ như một khuyết tật tim đã gây nên cái chết cho họ. Nhưng tình trạng tê liệt khi ngủ và những tín ngưỡng dân gian về nguyên nhân gây ra nó cũng đóng một vai trò quan trọng, Adler tranh luận trong quyển sách của mình: Sleep Paralysis: Night-mares, Nocebos, and the Mind Body Connection (tạm dịch: Bóng đè: Ác mộng, Nocebo và sự kết nối giữa não bộ và cơ thể).

Một bác sĩ tim mạch tại Đại học y khoa Baylor, Texas đã đi khắp một phần hai đất nước để tìm kiếm mối liên kết giữa SUNDS, giai đoạn REM và tình trạng tê liệt khi ngủ. Bác sĩ Matteo Vatta phát hiện ra rằng nam giới Đông Nam Á có xu hướng rối loạn nhịp tim di truyền. Điều này có thể là nguyên nhân gây nên cái chết của người Hmông trong những năm 80.

"Trái tim có thể hoạt động bình thường trong một thời gian, rồi sau đó dừng lại đột ngột," bác sĩ Vatta nói trên blog LiveScience. "Thông thường, tim sẽ ngừng đập vào ban đêm, và ở Đông Nam Á nó đã gây ra cái chết ở những người nam giới trẻ tuổi nhiều hơn cả tai nạn xe hơi."

"Tại Indonesia, chúng tôi tin tưởng vào một thế giới vô hình. Chúng tôi không bao giờ cho rằng thế giới đó tách biệt khỏi cuộc sống của mình, và vì thế chúng tôi xem nó như một điều hiển nhiên khi điều gì đó có thể xảy ra bất cứ lúc nào." - Risa Permandeli.

Đừng quá lo lắng, SUNDS và rep-repan không giống nhau. Chúng chỉ là những điều khó hiểu thường gặp và tốt nhất hãy phớt lờ khi chúng xảy ra với bạn. Andreas nói với tôi.

"Tuy nó không thể gây hại cho chúng ta, nhưng nó mang lại những hệ lụy không tốt." ông nói. "Ý tôi là tình trạng tê liệt khi ngủ là dấu hiệu cho thấy bạn đang thiếu ngủ trầm trọng. Vì vậy nó có thể rất tai hại nếu bạn đang điều khiển xe ô tô hay xe máy trong tình trạng này, đúng không?"

Người Hmông cảm thấy khiếp sợ khi hiện tượng này xảy ra. Vậy lời khuyên của Andreas là gì? Hãy giữ bình tĩnh và cố gắng ngủ lại.

"Đừng cố chống lại nó, chỉ càng mệt thêm thôi," ông nói. "Hãy cứ cố gắng ngủ lại lần nữa. Mọi thứ rồi sẽ ổn, thậm chí khi nó có vẻ rất đáng sợ."

Không chỉ có người Đông Nam Á cảm thấy sợ hãi. Cụm từ "ác mộng" được cho là xuất phát từ cụm từ trong tiếng Na-uy "mare" - một thế lực hay sức mạnh siêu nhiên thích đè lên lồng ngực hay làm nghẹt thở khi người ta đang ngủ.

Ở Indonesia, những quan niệm có xu hướng truyền từ thế hệ này sang thế hệ khác, vì vậy không có gì ngạc nhiên khi các quan niệm lạc hậu về ma quỷ vẫn còn rất phổ biến ngày nay. Nhưng có phải tất cả điều đó đều kì quặc? Khoa học thật vĩ đại và bao quát, nhưng sẽ như thế nào nếu hình hài mờ ảo tôi nhìn thấy về đêm thật sự là ma?

Tôi đã liên lạc với Risa Permandeli, một chuyên gia về bóng ma và chủ nghĩa huyền bí ở Indonesia, để hỏi tại sao những quan niệm này vẫn còn phổ biến ở Indonesia.

"Người dân chỉ chấp nhận những thông tin mà họ nhận được, và chẳng bao giờ thay đổi quan điểm của mình. Không có bất kì nỗ lực nào để phản đối hay làm sáng tỏ những quan niệm đó. Chúng ta chẳng bao giờ quan tâm đến việc phải xác minh một điều gì đó."

Ở một quốc gia có quá nhiều người tin vào những quan niệm về các thế lực siêu nhiên thì các câu chuyện về ma quỷ và truyền thuyết cổ xưa vẫn tồn tại.

Risa nói :"Ở Indonesia chúng tôi tin vào thế giới vô hình. Chúng tôi không bao giờ nghĩ chúng tách biệt với mình và xem nó như sự thật hiển nhiên khi điều gì đó có thể xảy ra bất kì lúc nào.

" Tôi nghĩ bất cứ nơi nào trên thế giới này cũng đều tồn tại quan niệm về thế giới vô hình, thậm chí ngay cả ở nước Pháp nơi con người nổi tiếng tin vào lý trí. Cùng với sự phát triển, niềm tin về một thế giới vô hình ở Tây Âu chấm dứt khi họ tìm ra chủ nghĩa duy lý. Ở đây, không có những thứ như chủ nghĩa duy lý dựa trên kiến thức, vì vậy những phong tục và thần thoại của chúng ta vẫn sẽ sống mãi."

 

Dịch bởi: ChiNguyen1502

bài viết đặc sắc trong tháng 11/2017

4 giá trị cốt lõi trong chương trình học tiếng Anh tại trung tâm Anh ngữ CEP

Đây là những giá trị quan trọng nhất và cũng là những điều tâm huyết nhất mà chúng tôi, những người nhìn giáo dục như một quá trình tự học hỏi, tự thay đổi và hoàn thiện bản thân trước…

Có thể bạn quan tâm

Tin cùng chuyên mục